How is Spousal Support Calculated?

By on Aug 3, 2017 in Divorce, Domestic Violence | 0 comments

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When you get a divorce, there are numerous areas where there can be disputes between you and your spouse, such as child custody and support, division of property, and perhaps the most controversial of all – spousal support.

According to the website of Higdon, Hardy & Zuflacht, spousal support is complicated than you think, because it is calculated with so many factors in mind. Divorce can be a life-changing experience, and the goal of spousal support is to at least minimize this change in the financial aspect. Below are some of the factors that are considered in spousal support calculations.

Duration of the marriage

If the spouses are married for more than 10 years, spousal support is more likely. A lot can happen in 10 years – a spouse that can be too used with the high standard of living, a spouse that has been away from the job market for a long time because of domestic duties. You name it. A spouse may need support if the sheer duration of the marriage is enough for him or her to not be able to provide properly for himself or herself.

Capacity to earn money

Does the spouse have a source of income, like employment or business? If he or she doesn’t, he or she may be entitled to alimony, especially if this fact has been caused by the marriage anyway. For example, if a spouse has sacrificed his or her job to take care of the house and kids, it is just fair that he or she receives support. Aside from source of income, the very capability to earn is also looked into, including factors such as age, marketability of skills, and medical conditions.

Custody to the child

The future expenses of the spouse are also taken into consideration, especially if there is a child involved. If the spouse has the custody for the child, he or she is, of course, liable to a lot of financial burdens, such as food, education, and shelter. The spouse may need financial support to fulfil this domestic obligation, especially if he or she has limited financial sources.

History of domestic violence

A spouse that has been abused may have physical, emotional, and psychological responses to the abusive acts he or she has experienced, and these responses may be enough to limit his or her capacity to earn money and his or her general enjoyment of life. So, he or she may deserve compensation in the form of spousal support.

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